Tag Archives: team game

Review with ‘World Cup Vs Pac-man Catch-up’

Final term tests are approaching fast for students in Japan, so now is a perfect time to review previous lessons.

I’m not going to take credit for the following game.  One of the fellow Interac’s in Kochi-Ken kindly shared this one with us at the last Shikoku meeting.  All I have done is used my Pac-man characters from Pac-man ping-pong and changed the name of the game to fit.

At first I didn’t realise how much of a hit this game would be.  My most rowdy of classes were completely engaged.  I can safely say this one was a complete success for me.

It went so well I thought I’d use it as a warm up in each of my elementary classes.   The response was even better.   I also think the students good behavior had a lot to do with the beautiful weather and the fact that I was alive and  genki to take on a new day.

Like any good game you use, the best time to stop is when they want it the most.  That way they will be more excited about playing it again.   This one is a solid tool in my box for future review sessions.

Here’s how to play.

Ingredients:

  • 1 Mrs Pac-man (cut out, laminated, magnet stuck to the back)
  • 1 Mr Pac-man (cut out, laminated, magnet stuck to the back)
  • Chalk/Board Pen
  • Flash cards
  • A set of questions on the subject you want to practice
  • 2 teams of students numbered from 1~10 in each team (for a class of 20)

Directions:

  1. Draw a large circle in the centre of the board
  2. draw small circles evenly around the big circle (these are stopping points for the characters)
  3. Place Mr and Mrs Pacman on opposite sides of the circle (Horizontal)
  4. Draw direction arrows around the outside of the circle to mark the direction Mr and Mrs Pacman move.
  5. Ask any pair of numbers to stand up, e.g.  ” Number 5s stand up please.”
  6. Ask those students a question.  The first student to ping-pong with the correct answer moves their Pac-man one space.
  7. The object of the game is to catch the other teams Pac-Man to win.

I mix up the style of question asking and choice of students to stand, so as the students never feel they can doze off until it’s their turn.

When I wanted to ask some tough questions and bring the game to a close, I asked the teams to choose their strongest members.

Keep it fast and fun!

Variation:

Next class, I intend to use the hype of the world cup combined with this review game, however, using the mascot from this years world cup along with mascots from earlier years world cups.

You can find all mascots here

If you are looking for more world cup ideas, check out the ESL Imaginarium.  Most lessons and activities are media based, but there are some which you could use in any classroom. Enjoy!

If you can think of any other fun variations, please share.  I look forward to your comments.  Thanks ♥

Q & A then Pass that toy. Multiple Relay.

Teaching with limited resource games and activities are invaluable to ESL teachers.    When you are short on time to plan or when you have to come up with a filler to see you through the last five minutes of class, these games are perfect.

First on the list is a conversation relay game suitable for classes of up to 30 students, however it works best in classes of 10 – 15 students.

LEVEL:   starter – lower intermediate .

5 ~ 15 mins

Materials needed:  1 small soft toy per team

Aim:  Asking and answering Q based on any grammar point.  (The example below focuses on plurals)

  • First arrange the students in 3 teams or 5-7 students per team.
  • Give the student at the front of each row a soft toy.

s1 to s2 –  “Do you like tomatoes?” (this s passes the toy to s2)

s2 to s1 – ” Yes I do.”

s2 to s3 – “Do you like hamburgers?”(s2 passes the toy to s3)

s3 to s4 – “No I don’t.”

s4 to s5 – “Do you like pineapple?”

Ok, can you see a pattern forming here?

  • This continues until the last student in each row answers, who then has to call out YOUR name, saying “Susan, here you are” You must only respond when the student calls your name.
  • The s throws the toy to you.
  • You must stand still on a spot at the front of the class, and try to catch the toy from there.
  • Only if you catch the toy, award a point to that team.
  • The student at the back of the row must then run to the front.
  • Pass the toy quickly to the s who is now standing at the front for the game to continue.
  • This is a very repetitive game, which I have found practices the key sentences with success.
  • It’s a fast pace TPR (Total Physical Response) activity, which the ss of all levels respond to very well.

If you have a larger class, but still want to play this game, this is another perfect opportunity to get the JTE involved.

You can use this for elementary through Junior High, simply changing the grammar point or choice of vocabulary.

Variation:

Make this game a little more difficult by telling the students that everyone in the team has to ask a different question.